128 kilometers (80miles) southwest of Kampala

Activities

Lake Nabugabo

Lake Nabugabo, located a few kilometers from Masaka town, has recently been declared a Ramsar site. A Ramsar site is a wetland elevated to international conservation status.  The wetland system consists of shallow freshwater with maximum depth of five metres and about 8.2km long by 5km wide and three smaller satellite lakes including Kayugi, Manywa and Kayanja. Its is separated from Lake victoria by a sand bar. About 300 plant species have been recorded at the site. The fauna ecosystem consists of a wide variety of key animal communities such as hippopotamus and sitatunga. While birds like kingfishers, crested crane and some important migratory birds can be sighted

Nabajjuzi wetlands

Nabajjuzi Wetland System is another ramsar site in the area. It has been identified as an Important Bird watching Area which contains a number of vulnerable and threatened species of birds. Notable species include the Shoebill, Papyrus Yellow Warbler and Papyrus Gonolek. Nabajjuzi seasonal wetlands are home and breeding areas to Uganda’s national bird, the Grey Crowned Crane. In addition the system is noted for two fish species indigenous to Nabajjuzi wetland the Mud fish and Lung fish. These species are important to the local fisheries, and spawn in the wetland on the onset of the rainy season.

Bukakata landing site

Bukakata is located approximately 44 kilometres by road from Masaka town. A landing site for the ferry that travels daily, between Bukakkata and Kalangala.

Buwama crocodile farm

Located along the Kampala-Masaka route in Buwama town, 50 kilometres from Masaka Town. It’s the only crocodile farm in Uganda. It has a large number of crocodile species of different ages, size and sex. The farm was formed in 1991 for mainly breeding the Nile crocodile (crocodylus). In addition the farm is located at the shores of Lake Victoria comprising of beautiful beaches and beautiful scenery for relaxation. The farm is also an educational center for veterinary research.

Lake Mburo National Park

Lake Mburo National Park is a compact gem, located conveniently close to the highway that connects Kampala to the parks of western Uganda. It is the smallest of Uganda’s savannah national parks and underlain by ancient Precambrian metamorphic rocks which date back more than 500 million years. It is home to 350 bird species as well as zebra, impala, eland, buffalo, oribi, Defassa waterbuck, leopard, hippo, hyena, topi and reedbuck.

Bwindi Impenetrable National Park

Bwindi Impenetrable National Park lies in southwestern Uganda on the edge of the Rift Valley. Its mist-covered hillsides are blanketed by one of Uganda’s oldest and most biologically diverse rainforests, which dates back over 25,000 years and contains almost 400 species of plants. More famously, this “impenetrable forest” also protects an estimated 400 mountain gorillas – roughly half of the world’s population, including several habituated groups, which can be tracked.

Queen Elizabeth National Park

Queen Elizabeth National Park is understandably Uganda’s most popular tourist destination. The park’s diverse ecosystems, which include sprawling savanna, shady, humid forests, sparkling lakes and fertile wetlands, make it the ideal habitat for classic big game, ten primate species including chimpanzees and over 600 species of birds. Set against the backdrop of the jagged Rwenzori Mountains, the park’s magnificent vistas include dozens of enormous craters carved dramatically into rolling green hills, panoramic views of the Kazinga Channel with its banks lined with hippos, buffalo and elephants, and the endless Ishasha plains, whose fig trees hide lions ready to pounce on herds of unsuspecting Uganda kob.